Sodium Carbonate Anhydrous (Soda ash light)​

Soda Ash Light is a low-density version of sodium carbonate. It has a broad industry application in the production of detergents, soaps, and other sodium compounds.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Chemical name: Sodium Carbonate Anhydrous 

CAS No.: 497-19-8

Molecular formula: Na2CO3

Standard Executed: GB/T210.2-2004

Packaging: in 40KG/50KG/750KG PP woven bag with PE liner

Contents

Description

Sodium carbonate naturally occurs in arid regions, especially in mineral sediments formed when seasonal lakes evaporate. Since ancient times, deposits of the mineral natron have been mined in Egypt, from dry lake bottoms. Natron was utilized in the preparation of mummies but also in the early manufacture of glass. 

The anhydrous form of sodium carbonate is a rare mineral called natrite. Sodium carbonate also erupts from Tanzania’s unique volcano, Ol Doinyo Lengai. It is considered to have erupted from other volcanoes in the past as well, but these minerals have likely been eroded due to their instability on Earth’s surface.

Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) has been used for making glass, soap, and gunpowder. Along with potassium carbonate, sodium carbonate was the foundation of the alkali industry, one of the first major chemical industries. Soda ash was also generated by burning wood and percolating the ashes with water. The ashes were “lixiviated” in order to form an alkali solution. After the water was boiled off, what remained was the yielded soda ash.

The particular name Soda Ash originates from the Barilla plant, used to produce sodium carbonate through the aforementioned process. Its scientific name is salsola soda; however, it goes by the common names of Sodawort or Glasswort, the latter pointing to the use in making glass.

Soda ash is used in glassmaking, in the production of sodium chemicals (sodium chromates, phosphates, and silicates), in the wood pulp industry, manufacturing soaps and detergents, in water softening and refining of oils and nonferrous metals. Its hydrous crystallized form is known as soda crystals, sal soda, or washing soda. Soda ash (Na2CO3) should not be confused with baking soda (sodium hydrogen carbonate or sodium bicarbonate, NaHCO3). The safety specifications for sodium carbonate can be considered less demanding than those for the related bicarbonates, due to its lower alkalinity.

Technical specification

Items Standards: TOP Standards: 1st Standards: 2nd
Purity (Na2CO3),% dry
≥99.2
≥98.8
≥98.0
Purity (Na2CO3),% wet
≥97.9
≥97.5
≥96.7
NaCl content, %
≤0.7
≤0.9
≤1.2
Ferric (Fe) content, %
≤0.0035
≤0.006
≤0.01
Sulphates (SO4) content, %
≤0.03
---
---
Water-insoluble matter content, %
≤0.03
≤0.1
≤0.15
Melting point
851 °C (1,564°F; 1,124 °K) in standard state (at 25 ℃[77 °F], 100 kPa)
851 °C (1,564°F; 1,124 °K) in standard state (at 25 ℃[77 °F], 100 kPa)
851 °C (1,564°F; 1,124 °K) in standard state (at 25 ℃[77 °F], 100 kPa)
Boiling point
1600℃
1600℃
1600℃
Density
2.54g/cm3 (25 ℃) in standard state (at 25 ℃[77 °F], 100 kPa)
2.54g/cm3 (25 ℃) in standard state (at 25 ℃[77 °F], 100 kPa)
2.54g/cm3 (25 ℃) in standard state (at 25 ℃[77 °F], 100 kPa)
Refractive index (nD)
1.485 in standard state (at 25 ℃[77 °F], 100 kPa)
1.485 in standard state (at 25 ℃[77 °F], 100 kPa)
1.485 in standard state (at 25 ℃[77 °F], 100 kPa)
Water solubility
Freely soluble in water
Freely soluble in water
Freely soluble in water
Specific gravity
2.532
2.532
2.532
pH
Aqueous solutions are strongly alkaline. At 25℃, the PH of 1, 5 and 10 wt% sodium carbonate solutions are 11.37, 11.58 and 11.70, respectively.
Aqueous solutions are strongly alkaline. At 25℃, the PH of 1, 5 and 10 wt% sodium carbonate solutions are 11.37, 11.58 and 11.70, respectively.
Aqueous solutions are strongly alkaline. At 25℃, the PH of 1, 5 and 10 wt% sodium carbonate solutions are 11.37, 11.58 and 11.70, respectively.
Sensitivity
Hygroscopic
Hygroscopic
Hygroscopic
Stability
Stable
Stable
Stable
Storage
Dry, tight-closed, in a dry and cool place
Dry, tight-closed, in a dry and cool place
Dry, tight-closed, in a dry and cool place
Shelf life/Retest
24 months
24 months
24 months
Appearance
White, odorless powder
White, odorless powder
White, odorless powder

Stability/Shelf life

Stable. Incompatible with powdered alkaline earth metals, aluminum, fluorine, organic nitro compounds, alkali metals, nonmetallic oxides, concentrated sulfuric acid, oxides of phosphorus.

Storage conditions: keep container tightly closed in a dry and well-ventilated place. Hygroscopic. Keep in a dry place. Storage class (TRGS 510): Non-Combustible Solids.

Manufacturing

There are a few common ways to produce sodium carbonate. It can be obtained as three hydrates and as an anhydrous salt. One way is the Ammonia Soda (Solvay) process, the reaction between sodium chloride and calcium carbonate where sodium hydrogen carbonate is heated (calcined). The other process is the extraction of sodium carbonate and hydrogen carbonate ores (trona and nahcolite). Anhydrous sodium carbonate, also known as calcined soda, is created by heating the hydrates. 

The decahydrate is formed from crystallized water solutions in the temperature range -2.1 to +32.0 °C. The heptahydrate forms in the narrow range 32.0 to 35.4 °C while above that temperature forms the monohydrate. In dry air, the heptahydrate and decahydrate lose water to give the monohydrate.

Industry use

Sodium carbonate has extensive applications in multiple industry fields around the world. One of the essential utilizations is in the manufacturing of glass—about half of the total production of Sodium carbonate is applied in this branch. As a strong chemical base, it is used in the manufacturing of pulp and paper, drinking water, textiles, soaps, detergents, and as a drain cleaner. In addition, it can also be used for tissue digestion, in dissolving amphoteric metals and compounds, as well as a cleaning agent.

Consumer use

Sodium carbonate is used in food preparation as a food additive, anticaking agent, raising agent, pH balancer, and stabilizer. It is used in the production of sherbet powder, and as a vital component in Chinese and German traditional cuisine.

Solubility

Soluble in water, aqueous alkalis, and glycerol. Partially soluble in aqueous alcohol. Insoluble in CS2, acetone, alkyl acetates, alcohol, benzonitrile, and liquid ammonia.

Common synonyms

  • Soda Ash
  • Washing Soda
  • Soda Crystals
  • Sodium Trioxocarbonate

Ask an expert

Did we forget something? Do you have a specific issue that needs a solution? Consider it done! Our professionals are at your service 24/7, ready to answer every question in a clear and concise manner.

Yes, functionally both dense and light can be used to produce powder detergents, in a spray drying tower. However, light soda ash is more economical. 

Generally, soda ash is not used in liquid detergents. Sodium citrate is used as a replacement of soda ash to adjust the pH level. 

Our MOQ for soda ash light is 21 tons in 1*20’’GP. 

STPP-Angie-Liu

Angie Liu

Product Manager